• Fri. Aug 12th, 2022

Urgent health warning for millions of Britons as orange skies engulf parts of the UK

Parts of Europe were blanketed in orange skies, sparking health concerns that airborne Saharan dust particles could trigger health emergencies for Britons

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The Met Office predicts how Saharan dust will affect England

Britons have been warned of a huge sandstorm which has reached the UK, turning the skies a burnt orange.

An urgent warning was issued to millions with orange dust swirling from the Sahara Desert on Wednesday.

Dust particles in the air could trigger deadly health emergencies after sweeping across Europe.

The ominous weather reached parts of England on Wednesday morning with particles expected to fall to the ground if it rains.

A Met Office spokesperson said on Twitter: “We can see the Saharan dust that has moved across Spain and France, into the south east of England.

“While this dust is mostly around 2km above ground level, some deposits may fall to the ground, particularly during today’s rains in the south of the UK.”

The weather made it difficult to breathe in parts of Spain for a second straight day on Wednesday and gave cleaning crews extra work as far away as Paris, London and Belgrade to remove the film of dirt falling on cars and buildings.







A Saharan dust cloud seen from Waterloo Bridge in London
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)


Europeans woke up to cloudy skies caused by the tiny particles that had traveled thousands of miles across the Mediterranean Sea.

In Spain, areas of Madrid and Murcia were lit in a bright orange color and residents were told to stay indoors after the sandstorm carried dust from Africa in high winds.







An urgent health warning was issued as parts of the UK were engulfed in orange skies
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Picture:

@metoffice/Twitter)


BBC weather presenter Carol Kirkwood said on Tuesday the dust storm was heading south into the UK.

She added: “There was very poor air quality today in parts of Spain, and it could well affect us on Wednesday in the south east and East Anglia.”







Sahara desert sand falls on cars in east London
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Picture:

Jack Dredd/REX/Shutterstock)


Dust storms can significantly harm the health of some people, studies show.

The gusts spread millions of particles in the air and increase the number of particles above the threshold allowed for human health.

The phenomenon is made up of natural particles, including very small materials, possible allergens and pollutants. These can be harmful to people with allergies and lung conditions, including asthma.

Some 5.4 million people suffer from asthma in the UK and experts have warned that extreme weather conditions, including storms, can trigger serious attacks.







Clouds of dust have been seen in southern England after parts of Spain were blanketed in a thick orange plume
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)


Asthma UK explained how thunderstorms can trigger asthma attacks and cause other symptoms.

“The air before a storm can feel very humid and close. Some people tell us it makes their chest tight and coughing, and makes it harder to breathe,” a spokesperson told The Sun.

“During pollen season, the windy conditions during a thunderstorm blow a lot of pollen into the air.

“Moisture higher in the air breaks the pollen down into much smaller pieces.

“As these little pieces of pollen particles settle, they can be inhaled, irritating the small airways in the lungs.”






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Picture:

Jack Dredd/REX/Shutterstock)


Clinical lead Dr Andy Whittamore said the toxic air can make people struggle to breathe and cause coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and even a fatal asthma attack.

He warned sufferers to carry their reliever inhaler with them at all times in case their symptoms worsen.

Other parts of the UK will see heavy clouds and light rain in eastern areas with some brighter periods in the south west.

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