• Fri. May 20th, 2022

UK weather forecast: Exact ‘snow bomb’ date as parts of UK set for 10in showers

The UK is set for a biting week before the snow arrives in mid-March with snow showers for most of the country and some areas could see up to 25cm of fall in temperatures below zero

The UK is expected to see heavy snowfall in mid-March

Britons are ready for another cold spell which will see heavy snowfall in mid-March and temperatures plunging with freezing below zero for much of the country.

After a period of wet weather, the start of Tuesday is likely to be frosty and temperatures could drop to -4C, according to the Met Office.

The weather is warming up as the week goes on, but there is more cold weather ahead.

New maps from WXCharts show an aggressive weather front coming from the southeast next Thursday (March 10) when the snow bomb is due to hit.

Some of the heaviest snowfall will come to Scotland with 25 centimeters likely to land.







Weather maps show heavy snow expected to start on March 10
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Picture:

WX graphics)


But there will also be showers in the Welsh Valleys, with Lancashire, Greater Manchester, Yorkshire and North East England also expected to experience up to three inches later today, the DailyStar reported .

In areas further south, this weather is expected to come in the form of heavy rain instead, with nine to 10mm expected to fall per hour in London, Bristol and the Home Counties.

Looking ahead to next week, the Met Office outlook for Saturday March 5 to Monday March 14 reads: ‘A largely settled start to this period with sunny spells in the north and west.







Much of the country is likely to see flurries of snow
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)


“Cloudier conditions with light rain or drizzle are more likely further south and east, although brighter periods are also possible here.

“Light winds are expected throughout the weekend with daytime temperatures close to average, although colder in the south. For the following week, there will likely be a northwest-southeast distribution of conditions. The southeast is most likely to be dry and set for the longest, with the northwest most likely to see wind and rain.”

Before that, residents in parts of the county will wake up Tuesday to sub-zero temperatures before the mercury rises during the day.

Met Office forecaster Aidan McGivern said: “Temperatures are otherwise dropping below freezing in places.







The snow will hold this week but it will be a frosty start to Tuesday
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Picture:

PENNSYLVANIA)


“So a chilly start of -2C to -4C for the sheltered parts of northern England and Scotland but a great day ahead as the high pressure sets in following the passage of this low front but it is linger there near the southeast.

“Then that other warm front attached to it starts moving north again by the end of Tuesday bringing cloudy, humid weather back for many.

“So a dull, wet start to the south east and lots of cloud cover I think for the southern counties of England, the south west on Tuesday morning. Meanwhile, north Wales, the north of Midlands to the north are blue skies for many. A few more showers for the north and northwest of Scotland, these tending to fade as the days go by.”

UK forecast for the next 5 days

Today:

Cloudy with outbreaks of rain in south east England, and also moving north in other parts of the south later. Early frost and scattered fog over central areas, with some showers in the north, then dry with sunny spells.

This evening:

Clear passages allowing frost and possibly a few patches of fog in the north. Clouds and outbreaks of rain over southern regions before later moving into central regions.

Wednesday:

Dry and bright for Scotland and northern England at first, but occasional clouds and rain further south will spread to other parts of the west. Becoming windy with strong northwesterly winds.

Outlook from Thursday to Saturday:

Slow moving band of clouds and rain on Thursday with the best of the brightness to the east and southeast. Getting drier and brighter for many with the overnight frost.

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