• Wed. May 25th, 2022

How did teenage Kamila Valieva’s story unfold in Beijing after a positive sample?

ByRandall B. Phelps

Feb 14, 2022

Kamila Valieva was allowed to continue competing in the Winter Olympics despite testing positive for trimetazidine, a banned heart medication.

An ad hoc committee set up by the Court of Arbitration for Sport has determined that no provisional suspension should be imposed on the 15-year-old Russian figure skater.

Here, the PA News Agency examines how one of the biggest controversies in Games history unfolded in beijing

FEBRUARY 6: Valieva makes her Olympic debut in the short program section of the mixed team event. Her routine scores 90.18, just short of her own world record of 90.45.

FEBRUARY 7: Valieva becomes the first female figure skater to land quad jumps at the Olympics, as her free skating routine seals Russia’s victory in the mixed team event.

Video: Urgent hearing to decide fate of Russian figure skater after failing drug test (Evening Standard)

Urgent hearing to decide fate of Russian figure skater after failing drug test

Click to enlarge

FOLLOWING

FOLLOWING

FEBRUARY 8: The medal ceremony for the mixed team is delayed due to what the International Skating Union (ISU) describes as a “legal issue” that requires further consultation.

FEBRUARY 9: The ‘Inside The Games’ website names Valieva as the figure skater at the center of a doping investigation that is delaying medal awards.



Kamila Valieva competed in the team event last week (Andrew Milligan/PA) (PA Wire)


© Provided by The Independent
Kamila Valieva competed in the team event last week (Andrew Milligan/PA) (PA Wire)

FEBRUARY 11: The International Testing Agency (ITA) confirms that Valieva tested positive for the banned heart drug trimetazidine on Christmas Day. She says she is appealing the lifting of a provisional suspension by the Russian Anti-Doping Agency (RUSADA).

February 12: The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the ISU confirm that they have also filed complaints with the Court of Arbitration for Sport, whose ad hoc committee is meeting to decide the case. Valieva, who continues to practice in Beijing, is making the appeal via video link.

FEBRUARY 14: CAS announces that Valieva has been cleared to continue competing. CAS cited “exceptional circumstances” for the decision, essentially revolving around his status as a “protected person” under the World Anti-Doping Code.

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